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Extract Based Questions for Wind Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

Extract based questions for the poem Wind has been prepared by our expert teachers. Students can read and learn from these questions and these are very important in their examination. Class 9 English Beehive poem Wind extract based questions are very helpful in understanding the chapter. It also help in the revision. Students can rely on these questions and answers taken from the extract of chapter Wind poem to get good marks in their English Paper.

Extract Based Questions for Wind Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

Wind Line by Line Explanation Class 9 English

Stanza 1

"Wind, come softly.
Don't break the shutters of the windows.
Don't scatter the papers.
Don't throw down the books on the shelf.
There, look what you did-you threw them all down.
You tore the pages of the books.
You brought rain again."

Word meanings:
  • Softly: gently
  • Shutters: moving window screens
  • Scatter: throw
  • Shelf: boards fixed in the almirah
Explanation:
Addressing the wind, the poet asks him to blow softly and gently. The wind is exhorted not to break the shutters of the windows, scatter the papers and throw down the books lying on the shelf. But the wind blows strongly and throws the books down, tears their pages and brings the rain again.

Stanza 2
"You're very clever at poking fun at weaklings.
Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling hearts-
The wind god winnows and crushes them all."

Word Meanings:
  • Clever: adept, skilled
  • Poking fun: making fun, ridiculing
  • Weaklings: persons or animals that are not strong physically
  • Frail: weak
  • Crumbling: falling into ruin
  • Rafters: sloping beam supporting a roof
  • Winnow: blow grain free of chaff; separate grain from husk by blowing on it
  • Crushes: breaks into small pieces, grind
Explanation:
The wind is very adept at poking fun at the weak. Decaying houses, doors, rafters, wood, human bodies, human lives and hearts are winnowed and crushed by the same wind that separates the chaff from the grains by blowing strongly.

Stanza 3
"He won't do what you tell him.
So, come, let's build strong homes.
Let's joint the doors firmly.
Practise to firm the body.
Make the heart steadfast.
Do this, and the wind will be friends with us."

Word Meanings:
  • Joint: put together, fasten two things with each other
  • Firmly: strongly
  • Practice: to exercise
  • Steadfast: firm, fixed, unyielding
Explanation:
The wilful wind does not heed the entreaty of men, who are weak in body and mind. The poet suggests a different approach. According to him, our houses should be strong, our doors firmly bolted, our bodies strengthened through exercise, and our heart made firm and unyielding. Then the wind will be friends with us.

Stanza 4
"The wind blows out weak fires.
He makes strong fires roar and flourish.
His friendship is good.
We praise him every day."

Word Meanings:
  • Fires roar and flourish: Fires become bigger and noisy
Explanation:
The wind puts out weak fires, such as, an oil-lamp or a burning match-stick, but it blows big fires into bigger fires which are difficult to extinguish. Such fires burn noisily. The wind is a good friend provided we are as strong as the wind. He deserves our praise for its power and strength.

Wind Extract Based Question Class 9 English

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow—

Stanza 1 of Wind

Wind, come softly.
Don't break the shutters of the windows.
Don't scatter the papers.
Don't throw down the books on the shelf.
There, look what you did-you threw them all down.
You tore the pages of the books.
You brought rain again.

Question 1: What does the poet ask the wind to do?
(a) The poet asks the wind not to blow.
(b) The poet asks the wind to blow softly.
(c) The poet asks the wind to bring rain.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) The poet asks the wind to blow softly.

Question 2: Which things does the poet ask the wind not to do?
(a) The poet asks the wind not to damage, shutters of the windows, scatter his papers and throw down the books.
(b) He asks the wind not to blow the roof of his house, tear up his clothes and damage his crops.
(c) He asks the wind not to damage his household goods.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) The poet asks the wind not to damage, shutters of the windows, scatter his papers and throw down the books.

Question 3: What does the wind actually do?
(a) The wind does as requested by the poet.
(b) The wind does not damage his things.
(c) The wind throws down the books, tears their pages and brings rain.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) The wind throws down the books, tears their pages and brings rain.

Question 4: Can the wind be asked to do or not to do a particular thing? Why?
(a) Yes, it can be asked what to do or what not to do. It is sensitive to human sufferings.
(b) No, it can't be asked what to do or what not to do. It is a force of nature.
(c) The wind does not care about our requests. It takes pleasure in human suffering.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) No, it can't be asked what to do or what not to do. It is a force of nature.

Answers : 1. (b) The poet asks the wind to blow softly. 2. (a) The poet asks the wind not to damange, shutters of the windows, scatter his papers and throw down the books. 3. (c) The wind throws down the books, tears their pages and brings rain. 4. (b) No, it can't be asked what to do or what not to do. It is a force of nature.

Stanza 2 of Wind

You're very clever at poking fun at weaklings.
Frail crumbling houses, crumbling doors, crumbling rafters,
crumbling wood, crumbling bodies, crumbling lives,
crumbling hearts-
The wind god winnows and crushes them all.

Question 1: "You're very clever ". Who is very clever?
(a) The reader
(b) The poet
(c) The wind
(d) The weaklings
Answer
(c) The wind

Question 2: Who are weakings?
(a) They are weak and decaying men and things
(b) Plants and animals
(c) School-going children
(d) Domestic animals
Answer
(a) They are weak and decaying men and things

Question 3: Who winnows and crushes whom?
(a) The wind winnows and crushes the weak and decaying men and things.
(b) The powerful people crush the weak.
(c) Men crush one another.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) The wind winnows and crushes the weak and decaying men and things.

Question 4: Is the fun poked by the wind kind or cruel?
(a) The fun poked by the wind is kind.
(b) It is cruel.
(c) It is neither kind nor cruel.
(d) It is cruel and kind both.
Answer
(b) It is cruel.

Stanza 3 of Wind

He won't do what you tell him.
So, come, let's build strong homes.
Let's joint the doors firmly.
Practise to firm the body.
Make the heart steadfast.
Do this, and the wind will be friends with us.

Question 1: How does the wind behave?
(a) The wind behaves kindly and generously.
(b) The wind behaves like a friend.
(c) The wind behaves stubbornly and wilfully.
(d) The wind behaves indifferently.
Answer
(c) The wind behaves stubbornly and wilfully.

Question 2: What does the poet suggest us to do to be friends with the wind?
(a) The poet suggests that our bodies and things should be as strong as the wind.
(b) We should keep praying to the wind to protect us.
(c) We should keep praying to the wind to protect us.
(d) All the above.
Answer
(a) The poet suggests that our bodies and things should be as strong as the wind.

Question 3: What is the attitude of the wind towards men and his things?
(a) The wind is kind to weak men and their week things.
(b) The wind likes to be friends with weak men and their weak things.
(c) The wind does not care for weak men and things. He crushes them all.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) The wind does not care for weak men and things. He crushes them all.

Question 4: When will the wind be friends with us?
(a) The wind will be friends with us if we and our things are weak and decaying.
(b) When we and our things are as strong as the wind, he will be friends with us.
(c) The wind will be friends with us whether we and our things are weak or strong.
(d) All the above.
Answer
(b) When we and our things are as strong as the wind, he will be friends with us.

Stanza 4 of Wind

The wind blows out weak fires.
He makes strong fires roar and flourish.
His friendship is good.
We praise him every day.

Question 1: What is the winds behaviour towards the weak fires?
(a) The wind helps weak fires grow into strong fires.
(b) The wind blows out weak fires, but helps strong fires grow and burn noisily.
(c) The wind behaves in the same manner towards the weak and the strong fires.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) The wind blows out weak fires, but helps strong fires grow and burn noisily.

Question 2: Which trait of the wind is revealed in its treatment of weak and strong fires?
(a) Being itself strong, the wind is friendly towards strong fires, but inimical towards weak fires.
(b) It treats both strong and weak fires equally.
(c) Sometimes the wind favours strong fires and sometimes it favours weak fires.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) Being itself strong, the wind is friendly towards strong fires, but inimical towards weak fires.

Question 3: How can the wind's friendship be good to us?
(a) The wind's friendship can be good to us when we and our things are as strong as the wind.
(b) The wind's friendship can be good if we worship it.
(c) Let, us and our things be weak and humble, and the wind will be our friend.
(d) The wind's friendship can never be good to us whatever we do.
Answer
(a) The wind's friendship can be good to us when we and our things are as strong as the wind.

Question 4: Why do we praise the wind?
(a) We praise the wind so that it may not harm us.
(b) We praise the wind because we consider the wind a God.
(c) We praise the wind because it brings rains with it. Also, it does not harm us if we are strong.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) We praise the wind because it brings rains with it. Also, it does not harm us if we are strong.

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