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Extract Based Question for Kathmandu Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

Extract based questions for Kathmandu has been prepared by our expert teachers. Students can read and learn from these questions and these are very important in their examination. Class 9 English Beehive chapter 10 Kathmandu extract based questions are very helpful in understanding the chapter. It also help in the revision. Students can rely on these questions and answers taken from the extract of chapter Kathmandu to get good marks in their English Literature Paper.

Extract Based Question for Kathmandu Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

Kathmandu Extract Based Question Class 9 English

Extract 1 Kathmandu

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow—

A corpse is being cremated on its banks; washerwomen are at their work and children bathe. From a balcony a basket of flowers and leaves, old offerings now wilted, is dropped into the river. A small shrine half protrudes from the stone platform on the river bank. When it emerges fully the goddess inside will escape and the evil period of the Kaliyug will end on earth.

Question 1: Which river is being talked about here?
(a) River Kankai
(b) Holy river Ganga
(c) Holy river Bagmati
(d) Budhi Gandaki river
Answer
(c) Holy river Bagmati

Question 2: What is being dropped into the river? And from where?
(a) A stone from a bridge
(b) A basket of flowers and leaves from a balcony
(c) Petrol from a car
(d) Lots of trash from a house
Answer
(b) A basket of flowers and leaves from a balcony

Question 3: How does the author indicate the water of the river is polluted here?
(a) Children take a bath here.
(b) People drop old offerings here.
(c) Washermen wash the clothes here.
(d) All of these
Answer
(d) All of these

Question 4: Which temple is being talked about here and where is it located?
(a) Prambanan temple, Indonesia
(b) Pashupatinath temple, Nepal
(c) Temple of heaven, Beijing
(d) Golden temple, India
Answer
(b) Pashupatinath temple, Nepal


Extract 2 Kathmandu

Kathmandu is vivid, mercenary, religious, with small shrines to flower-adorned deities along the narrowest and busiest streets; with fruit sellers, flute sellers, hawkers of postcards; shops selling Western cosmetics, film rolls and chocolate; or copper utensils and Nepalese antiques. Film songs blare out from the radios, car horns sound, bicycle bells ring, stray cows low questioningly at motorcycles, vendors shout out their wares.

Question 1: Kathmandu has a religious look because of :
(a) shops selling flowers and leaves
(b) narrow and busy streets
(c) small shrines and flower adorned deities
(d) shops selling idols of Gods and Goddesses
Answer
(c) small shrines and flower adorned deities

Question 2: What were the shopkeepers selling?
(a) fruits and flutes
(b) film rolls and chocolates
(c) utensils and antiques
(d) all of these
Answer
(d) all of these

Question 3: What kind of utensils and antiques are sold in Kathmandu?
(a) Clay utensils and Indian antiques
(b) Steel utensils and Indian antiques
(c) Brass utensils and Nepalese antiques
(d) Copper utensils and Nepalese antiques
Answer
(d) Copper utensils and Nepalese antiques

Question 4: The meaning of the word 'mercenary' is :
(a) kind
(b) merciful
(c) clever
(d) greedy
Answer
(d) greedy

Extract 3 Kathmandu

I consider what route I should take back home. If I were propelled by enthusiasm for travel per se, I would go by bus and train to Patna, then sail up the Ganges past Benaras to Allahabad, then up the Yamuna, past Agra to Delhi. But I am too exhausted and homesick; today is the last day of August. Go home, I tell myself : move directly towards home. I enter a Nepal Airlines office and buy a ticket for tomorrow's flight.

Question 1: What did the author think about?
(a) the gifts he should take for his family
(b) the route he should take back home
(c) the cloths he should buy
(d) the things he shouldn't buy
Answer
(b) the route he should take back home

Question 2: How was the author feeling?
(a) He was very confused.
(b) He was enjoying and didn't want to go back home.
(c) He was very exhausted and homesick.
(d) He was very happy.
Answer
(c) He was very exhausted and homesick.

Question 3: Why was he feeling so?
(a) because he didn't like anything in China.
(b) because he was travelling continuously for a long time.
(c) because he was not finding good food.
(d) because he has been in China for years now.
Answer
(b) because he was travelling continuously for a long time.

Question 4: Name the holy rivers mentioned here :
(a) Ganga and Brahmaputra
(b) Godavari and Indus
(c) Ganga and Yamuna
(d) Narmada and Kaveri
Answer
(c) Ganga and Yamuna

Extract 4 Kathmandu

From time to time he stands the pole on the ground, selects a flute and plays for a few minutes. The sound rises clearly above the noise of the traffic and the hawkers' cries. He plays slowly, meditatively, without excessive display. He does not shout out his wares. Occasionally he makes a sale, but in a curiously offhanded way as if this were incidental to his enterprise. Sometimes he breaks off playing to talk to the fruit seller. I imagine that this has been the pattern of his life for years.

Question 1: The sound of the flute rises dearly above the noise of :
(a) the hawker's cries
(b) the traffic
(c) mantras
(d) None of these
Answer
(c) mantras

Question 2: How does he play flute?
(a) He plays without excessive display
(b) He plays meditatively
(c) He plays slowly
(d) All of these
Answer
(d) All of these

Question 3: Which of the following statements is true about the flute seller?
(a) He keeps shouting his wares loudly.
(b) He shouts out his wares occasionally.
(c) He shouts out his wares in a soft voice.
(d) He does not shout out his wares.
Answer
(d) He does not shout out his wares.

Question 4: Why does he break off playing?
(a) To talk to the people around
(b) To talk to the fruit seller
(c) To shout out his wares
(d) To drink some water
Answer
(b) To talk to the fruit seller

Extract 5 Kathmandu

I find it difficult to tear myself away from the square. Flute music always does this to me : it is at once the most universal and most particular of sounds. There is no culture that does not have its flute-the reed neh, the recorder, the Japanese shakuhachi, the deep bansuri of Hindustani classical music, the clear or breathy flutes of South America, the high-pitched Chinese flutes. Each has its specific fingering and compass. It weaves its own associations.

Question 1: What does the author find difficult?
(a) To bear the sound of drums
(b) To go away from the guitar sound
(c) To go away from the flute sound
(d) To live without music
Answer
(c) To go away from the flute sound

Question 2: What does the author mention here?
(a) Five types of flutes
(b) Six types of musical instruments
(c) Two types of pianos
(d) A type of drum
Answer
(a) Five types of flutes

Question 3: What is the quality of Chinese flutes?
(a) They are low-pitched flutes
(b) They are beautiful flutes
(c) They are clear and breathy flutes
(d) They are high-pitched flutes
Answer
(d) They are high-pitched flutes

Question 4: Different countries' flutes are different in terms of :
(a) sound
(b) looking
(c) fingering and compass
(d) way of playing
Answer
(c) fingering and compass

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