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Extract Based Questions for A Legend of the Northland Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

Extract based questions for the poem A Legend of the Northland has been prepared by our expert teachers. Students can read and learn from these questions and these are very important in their examination. Class 9 English Beehive poem A Legend of the Northland extract based questions are very helpful in understanding the chapter. It also help in the revision. Students can rely on these questions and answers taken from the extract of chapter A Legend of the Northland poem to get good marks in their English Paper.

Extract Based Questions for A Legend of the Northland Class 9 English Beehive with Solutions

A Legend of the Northland Line by Line Explanation Class 9 English

Stanza 1

"Away, away in the Northland,
Where the hours of the day are few,
And the nights are so long in winter
That they cannot sleep them through"

Word Meanings:
  • Northland: Any extremely cold country in the earth's north polar region
  • Legend: An old traditional story
Explanation:
Far, far away in the Northland, the days are very short and the nights are so long that the people there cannot keep sleeping through the whole night.

Stanza 2
"Where they harness the swift reindeer
To the sledges, when it snows;
And the children look like bear's cubs
In their funny, furry clothes"

Word Meanings:
  • Harness: Attach to
  • Swift: Fast
  • Sledges: Carts that slide on ice
  • Furry: Having hair on the animal-skin used as cloth
Explanation:
In Northland, people put in harness fast-moving reindeer to draw their sledges when it snows. Children are covered in funny clothes made of fur and look like bear's cubs.

Stanza 3
"They tell them, a curious story-
I don't believe, tis true;
And yet you may learn a lesson
If I tell the tale to you."

Word Meanings:
  • Curious: Strange, odd
  • Lesson: Moral message
Explanation:
The people of Northland tell their children a strange story. The poet comments that it may not be a true story, yet it can teach a lesson to whoever hears it.

Stanza 4
"Once, when the good Saint Peter
Lived in the world below,
And walked about it, preaching,
Just as he did, you know,"

Word Meanings:
  • Preaching: I Giving moral, religious advice
Explanation:
Once pious St. Peter lived on the earth and walked about from place to place, preaching the people.

Stanza 5
"He came to the door of a cottage,
In travelling round the earth,
Where a little woman was making cakes,
And baking them on hearth;"

Word Meanings:
  • Baking: Cook or harden by dry heat
  • Hearth: Part of room where fire is made
Explanation:
St. Peter came to the house of a little woman who was baking cakes on the hearth, while he was going place to place, preaching.

Stanza 6
And being faint with fasting,
For the day was almost done,
He asked her, from her store of cakes,
To give him a single one.

Word Meanings:
  • Faint: Very weak
  • Fasting: Going without food
  • Store: Collection, heap
Explanation:
Being very weak with fasting, at the end of the day, St. Peter asked the woman for a cake from the heap of the cakes she had baked.

Stanza 7
"So she made a very little cake,
But as it baking lay,
She looked at it, and thought it seemed
Too large to give away."

Word Meanings:
  • Give away: Give freely
Explanation:
When asked by St. Peter for a cake, the woman made a very small cake but when she looked at it, while it lay baking, she thought that it was too large to be given away.

Stanza 8
"Therefore she kneaded another,
And still a smaller one;
But it looked, when she turned it over,
As large as the first had done."

Word Meanings:
  • Kneaded: I Worked up flour into dough
Explanation:
So, the woman worked up the flour to make another cake, a smaller one. But, when she turned it over, she thought it was as large as the first one.

Stanza 9
"Then she took a tiny scrap of dough,
And rolled and rolled it flat;
And baked it thin as a wafer-
But she couldn't part with that."

Word Meanings:
  • Tiny: Very small
  • Scrap: Piece
  • Dough: Worked-up flour
  • Wafer: Very thin cake
  • Part with: Give away
Explanation:
Then she took a very small piece of dough and rolled and rolled it into a flat cake. Then she baked it like a wafer. But she could not give even this cake away.

Stanza 10
For she said, "My cakes that seem too small
When I eat of them myself
Are yet too large to give away."
So she put them on the shelf.

Word Meanings:
  • Seem: appear
  • Give away: to bestow something upon someone
Explanation:
The woman could not part with even the wafer-thin cake that she had baked. She thought that her cakes seemed too small to her when she herself ate them, but too large when she had to give them away to someone.

Stanza 11
"Then good Saint Peter grew angry,
For he was hungry and faint;
And surely such a woman
Was enough to provoke a saint."

Word Meanings:
  • Provoke: Irritate, incense, make angry
Explanation:
When the woman put away all her cakes, not giving any to the saint, he (the saint) grew angry at such niggardliness of hers. After all, he was so hungry and faint. The woman's behaviour was enough to provoke the saint.

Stanza 12
"And he said, "You are far too selfish
To dwell in a human form,
To have both food and shelter,
And fire to keep you warm."
 
Word Meanings:
  • Dwell: Reside, live
  • Human form: Human body
  • Shelter: A place to live, home
Explanation:
Getting angry, the saint scolded the miserly woman saying that she was so selfish that she didn't deserve to live in a human form, as a human being. She didn't deserve.

Stanza 13
"Now, You shall build as the birds do,
And shall get your scanty food
By boring, and boring, and boring,
All day in the hard, dry wood."

Word Meanings:
  • Scanty: Lacking in quantity or magnitude
  • Boring: Making hole, digging
Explanation:
Scolding the woman for her extreme selfishness, the saint cursed her that from now onwards, she should build a nest like a bird to live in and should have her insufficient food by making a hole with her beak in the hard, dry wood, all day.

Stanza 14
"Then up she went through the chimney,
Never speaking a word,
And out of the top flew a woodpecker,
For she was changed to a bird."

Word Meanings:
  • Woodpecker: A bird with strong claws and a stiff tail and a hard chisel-like bill for boring into wood for insects.
Explanation:
At the curse of the saint, the woman went up the chimney without speaking a word. She came out of the top of the chimney in the form of a woodpecker and flew away. She had been changed to a bird.

Stanza 15
She had a scarlet cap on her head,
And that was left the same;
But all the rest of her clothes were burned
Black as a coal in the flame.
 
Word Meanings:
  • Scarlet: Red
Explanation:
She had a red cap on her head which she had as a bird also, but all the rest of her clothes were turned as black as coal due to the fire and heat of the chimney.

Stanza 16
"And every country schoolboy
Has seen her in the wood,
Where she lives in the trees till this very day,
Boring and boring for food."

Word Meanings:
  • Country: Rural area of a district
  • Boring: make holes
Explanation:
Every schoolboy has seen this bird, woodpecker, in the forest, where it still lives in the trees. It keeps boring holes in the tree-trunks for food.

A Legend of the Northland Extract Based Question Class 9 English

Read the following extracts carefully and answer the questions that follow—

Stanza 1 of A Legend of the Northland

Away, away in the Northland,
Where the hours of the day are few,
And the nights are so long in winter
That they cannot sleep them through

Question 1: Which country is the poet talking about?
(a) He is talking about an extremely cold country, which he calls as Northland.
(b) He is talking about a cold country near the south pole.
(c) It is a hot country in the north Africa.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) He is talking about an extremely cold country, which he calls as Northland.

Question 2: What does the poet mean by, "Where the hours of the day are few"?
(a) The days are long there.
(b) The days are very short there.
(c) The days are neither long nor short.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) The days are very short there.

Question 3: How long are the nights in the Northland in winter?
(a) The nights in the Northland in winter are not long enough for people there to have a full sleep.
(b) The nights there are as long as they are at other places.
(c) The nights there are so long in winter that people find it difficult to keep sleeping all through the night.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) The nights there are so long in winter that people find it difficult to keep sleeping all through the night.

Question 4: How do you think people would pass such long nights?
(a) They would keep working at night too.
(b) They would keep themselves busy in household chores till late in the night.
(c) They would sleep in the day and work at night.
(d) They would tell long stories, funny incidents and folklores to children.
Answer
(d) They would tell long stories, funny incidents and folklores to children.

Stanza 2 of A Legend of the Northland

Where they harness the swift reindeer
To the sledges, when it snows;
And the children look like bear's cubs
In their funny, furry clothes

Question 1: "Where they harness" Whom does 'they' here refer to?
(a) 'They' here refers to the people of Northland.
(b) 'They' here refers to the reindeer.
(c) 'They' here refers to the sledges.
(d) 'They' here refers to the children.
Answer
(a) 'They' here refers to the people of Northland.

Question 2: What is the means of travel when it snows in Northland?
(a) People move on skates to go from one place to another.
(b) People walk on ice.
(c) Reindeer, drawn sledges are the means of travel there.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) Reindeer, drawn sledges are the means of travel there.

Question 3: How do children look when they wear warm furry clothes?
(a) They look like ghosts.
(b) They look like bear's cubs.
(c) They look like cats.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) They look like bear's cubs.

Question 4: Why do they wear furry clothes?
(a) Furry clothes keep them warm in the extremely cold weather.
(b) Furry clothes make them look pretty.
(c) Furry clothes suit their soft skin.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) Furry clothes keep them warm in the extremely cold weather.

Stanza 3 of A Legend of the Northland

They tell them, a curious story-
I don't believe, tis true;
And yet you may learn a lesson
If I tell the tale to you.

Question 1: "They tell them a curious story." Who tell a curious story and to whom?
(a) The children of Northland tell a curious story to their friends.
(b) The people of Northland tell a curious story to their children.
(c) The children of Northland tell a curious story to their parents.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) The people of Northland tell a curious story to their children.

Question 2: Why is the story "curious"?
(a) it involves a curious incident where a woman is turned into a bird.
(b) the children like to hear it very much.
(c) it only entertains the children.
(d) it carries a moral lesson.
Answer
(a) it involves a curious incident where a woman is turned into a bird.

Question 3: "If I tell the tale to you." Whom does T here refer to?
(a) T here refers to a parent who is telling a story to her child.
(b) T here refers to the poet.
(c) T here refers to a child.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) T here refers to the poet.

Question 4: Give a synonym of 'curious'.
(a) uninteresting
(b) very long
(c) instructive
(d) strange
Answer
(d) strange

Stanza 4 of A Legend of the Northland

Once, when the good Saint Peter
Lived in the world below,
And walked about it, preaching,
Just as he did, you know,

Question 1: "Lived in the world below". Which world is the poet talking about?
(a) He is talking about the lower world.
(b) He is talking about the earth.
(c) He is talking about heaven.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) He is talking about the earth.

Question 2: What did Saint Peter do?
(a) He went about begging food.
(b) He went about curing the people.
(c) He went about preaching the people.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) He went about preaching the people.

Question 3: "The good Saint Peter". Why does the poet address Saint Peter as 'good'?
(a) He was a holy man, an apostle of Christ.
(b) He looted the rich and helped the poor.
(c) He cured the people of their illness.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) He was a holy man, an apostle of Christ.

Question 4: What does the poet mean by 'preaching'?
(a) Giving things which people need.
(b) Giving money to the needy.
(c) Giving moral and religious advice.
(d) Giving books to the children to read.
Answer
(c) Giving moral and religious advice.

Stanza 5 of A Legend of the Northland

He came to the door of a cottage,
In travelling round the earth,
Where a little woman was making cakes,
And baking them on hearth;

Question 1: Where did St. Peter come while travelling around the earth?
(a) He came to an inn.
(b) He came to the house of a peasant.
(c) He came to a church.
(d) He came to the door of a cottage.
Answer
(d) He came to the door of a cottage.

Question 2: What was the little woman doing?
(a) She was baking cakes on the hearth.
(b) She was eating her meal.
(c) She was sleeping in her cottage.
(d) She was just sitting, doing nothing.
Answer
(a) She was baking cakes on the hearth.

Question 3: What is a "hearth"?
(a) A hearth is the place where a meal is eaten.
(b) A hearth is the place where fire is made for cooking.
(c) A hearth is a place for cooking food.
(d) A hearth is a place for rest after a heavy meal.
Answer
(b) A hearth is the place where fire is made for cooking.

Question 4: What is "baking"?
(a) cooking or hardening something by dry heat.
(b) cooking something by boiling in water.
(c) cooking something after cooling.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) cooking or hardening something by dry heat.

Stanza 6 of A Legend of the Northland

And being faint with fasting,
For the day was almost done,
He asked her, from her store of cakes,
To give him a single one.

Question 1: Who was fainting with fasting?
(a) The little woman who was baking cakes was fainting with fasting.
(b) St. Peter was fainting with fasting.
(c) A man who was passing by the cottage was fainting.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) St. Peter was fainting with fasting.

Question 2: What time of the day was it?
(a) It was afternoon.
(b) It was morning.
(c) It was nearly the end of the day.
(d) It was night.
Answer
(c) It was nearly the end of the day.

Question 3: How many cakes did St. Peter ask the woman for?
(a) One cake
(b) Two cakes
(c) Three cakes
(d) Four cakes
Answer
(a) One cake

Question 4: What is fasting?
(a) to willingly walk fast
(b) to go willingly without food
(c) to willingly cook fast
(d) to drive fast
Answer
(b) to go willingly without food

Stanza 7 of A Legend of the Northland

So she made a very little cake,
But as it baking lay,
She looked at it, and thought it seemed
Too large to give away.

Question 1: Why did the woman make so little a cake?
(a) Being ungenerous, she wanted to make the cake as little as possible.
(b) She was adept at making small cakes.
(c) She wanted to give away many small cakes.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) Being ungenerous, she wanted to make the cake as little as possible.

Question 2: Why did the woman look at the cake?
(a) She wanted to make sure that it was big enough.
(b) She wanted to make sure that it was well-baked.
(c) She wanted to ensure that it was really little.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) She wanted to ensure that it was really little.

Question 3: Was the cake "too large to give away"?
(a) Yes, it was.
(b) No, it wasn't. However, she thought so.
(c) It was neither big nor small.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) No, it wasn't. However, she thought so.

Question 4: What made the woman think that the cake was very large?
(a) Being generous, she thought so.
(b) Being stingy and uncharitable, she thought so.
(c) The cake was very large indeed.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) Being stingy and uncharitable, she thought so.

Stanza 8 of A Legend of the Northland

Therefore she kneaded another,
And still a smaller one;
But it looked, when she turned it over,
As large as the first had done.

Question 1: Why did the woman knead the dough for another cake?
(a) She wanted to make a larger cake.
(b) She did not want to give away the first cake, so she kneaded the dough for another.
(c) She wanted to give away more than one cake.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) She did not want to give away the first cake, so she kneaded the dough for another.

Question 2: Was the cake as large as the first one?
(a) No, it wasn't. Rather, it was smaller than the first one.
(b) Yes, it was as large as the first one.
(c) It was even larger than the first one.
(d) None of the above.
Answer 
(a) No, it wasn't. Rather, it was smaller than the first one.

Question 3: Why did the cake look as large as the first one?
(a) It was, indeed, as large as the first one.
(b) It was the woman's miserly eyes to whom it looked as large as the first one.
(c) It was the woman's poor eyesight that made it look as large as the first one.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) It was the woman's miserly eyes to whom it looked as large as the first one.

Question 4: What kind of person was the woman?
(a) She was a poor but generous person.
(b) She was quite hospitable, who gave away food to the hungry.
(c) She was a selfish, miserly and self-centred person.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) She was a selfish, miserly and self-centred person.

Stanza 9 of A Legend of the Northland

Then she took a tiny scrap of dough,
And rolled and rolled it flat;
And baked it thin as a wafer-
But she couldn't part with that.

Question 1: What did the woman do to make a very small cake?
(a) She took a very small piece of dough and flattened it by rolling it again and again.
(b) She got her companion to make a very small cake.
(c) She went on reducing the size of the piece of dough.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) She took a very small piece of dough and flattened it by rolling it again and again.

Question 2: Was she able to give even that cake to the saint?
(a) Yes, she was, but the saint refused to take it.
(b) Yes, she was. The saint ate it up and blessed the woman.
(c) No, she wasn't. She couldn't part with even that cake.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) No, she wasn't. She couldn't part with even that cake.

Question 3: Do you think this woman ever gave away anything to a needy person?
(a) Yes, I think so. Giving was something natural to her nature.
(b) No, I don't think so. Giving was something foreign to her nature.
(c) Yes, I think so. She was generous and charitable by nature.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) No, I don't think so. Giving was something foreign to her nature.

Question 4: What does this incident show about the woman?
(a) She is generous and kind towards the needy.
(b) She loves to feed the hungry.
(c) She doesn't like to show off her acts of charity.
(d) She is selfish, self-centred and uncharitable person who cannot help a needy person.
Answer
(d) She is selfish, self-centred and uncharitable person who cannot help a needy person.

Stanza 10 of A Legend of the Northland

For she said, "My cakes that seem too small
When I eat of them myself
Are yet too large to give away."
So she put them on the shelf.

Question 1: When did her cakes seem too large to her?
(a) when she tried to give them away.
(b) when she herself tried to eat them.
(c) when she tried to eat them without any appetite.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) when she tried to give them away.

Question 2: "My cakes small myself." What does this line show about the woman?
(a) This line shows her generosity.
(b) This line shows the pettiness and self-centredness of her heart.
(c) This line shows her charitable nature.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) This line shows the pettiness and self-centredness of her heart.

Question 3: Do you see any satire in these lines?
(a) Yes, it is satirical that her cakes seemed small to her when she herself ate them.
(b) There is nothing satirical in these lines.
(c) Yes, it is satirical that the same cakes seem small as well as large to the same person.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) Yes, it is satirical that the same cakes seem small as well as large to the same person.

Question 4: Did she give away the thin cake?
(a) No, she didn't. Even the thin cake seemed too large to be given away.
(b) Yes, she did. But the saint refused to take it.
(c) Yes, she did. The saint took it and blessed her.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) No, she didn't. Even the thin cake seemed too large to be given away.

Stanza 11 of A Legend of the Northland

Then good Saint Peter grew angry,
For he was hungry and faint;
And surely such a woman
Was enough to provoke a saint.

Question 1: Why did St. Peter grow angry?
(a) St. Peter grew angry at the woman's behaviour of not giving him any cake.
(b) The woman had humiliated the saint by her abusive words.
(c) St. Peter was extremely hungry, so it was natural for him to be angry.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) St. Peter grew angry at the woman's behaviour of not giving him any cake.

Question 2: What was the additional reason for St. Peter's getting angry?
(a) The woman had humiliated him by saying abusive words.
(b) The saint was getting late as the woman kept him waiting.
(c) He was very hungry and weak. This incensed him more.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) He was very hungry and weak. This incensed him more.

Question 3: "And surely such a woman " What kind of woman is the poet talking about?
(a) He is talking of a woman who is abusive and disrespectful.
(b) He is talking of a woman who takes very less time to help others.
(c) He is talking of a woman who keeps others waiting before giving them anything.
(d) He is talking about a petty-minded, selfish woman.
Answer
(d) He is talking about a petty-minded, selfish woman.

Question 4: Can a saint be provoked easily?
(a) No, a true saint can't be provoked easily.
(b) Yes, saints are angry persons. They are provoked easily.
(c) Saints are proud people. They are provoked easily if their pride is hurt even a little.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) No, a true saint can't be provoked easily.

Stanza 12 of A Legend of the Northland

And he said, "You are far too selfish
To dwell in a human form,
To have both food and shelter,
And fire to keep you warm.

Question 1: What did provoke the saint?
(a) The woman's abusive words.
(b) The woman's unwillingness to help the saint.
(c) The woman's extremely selfish behaviour.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) The woman's extremely selfish behaviour.

Question 2: Why did the woman not deserve to be a human being?
(a) She looked more like an animal than a human being.
(b) She had no qualities of a human being. She was a brute in human form.
(c) She did not show any interest in St. Peter's preachings unlike others who did.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) She had no qualities of a human being. She was a brute in human form.

Question 3: Which things did the woman not deserve?
(a) She did not deserve food, shelter, fire and a human body.
(b) She did not deserve love and respect from others.
(c) She did not deserve a saint's presence at her doorstep.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) She did not deserve food, shelter, fire and a human body.

Question 4: Which word in these lines has the same meaning as, to live or to reside?
(a) form
(b) shelter
(c) warm
(d) dwell
Answer
(d) dwell

Stanza 13 of A Legend of the Northland

Now, You shall build as the birds do,
And shall get your scanty food
By boring, and boring, and boring,
All day in the hard, dry wood."

Question 1: Where shall the woman now live according to the saint?
(a) She shall build a nest like birds to live.
(b) She shall live in a cave.
(c) She shall live in a dry well.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) She shall build a nest like birds to live.

Question 2: How shall the woman get her food?
(a) She shall go begging food from door to door.
(b) She shall steal corn from the fields of her neighbours.
(c) She shall get her insufficient food by boring, all day, a hole in the hard, dry wood.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) She shall get her insufficient food by boring, all day, a hole in the hard, dry wood.

Question 3: How did the woman lose all her comforts she enjoyed as a human being?
(a) The woman lost her comforts because of her miserliness.
(b) She lost her comforts because of the curse of the saint.
(c) She lost all her comforts for no fault of hers.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) She lost her comforts because of the curse of the saint.

Question 4: Find out the word from the given lines which means : Lacking in quantity.
(a) boring
(b) dry
(c) scanty
(d) wood
Answer
(c) scanty

Stanza 14 of A Legend of the Northland

Then up she went through the chimney,
Never speaking a word,
And out of the top flew a woodpecker,
For she was changed to a bird.

Question 1: Where did the woman go?
(a) She went into her cottage.
(b) She went up through the chimney of her house.
(c) She went to her store-house.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) She went up through the chimney of her house.

Question 2: Why did she not speak any word?
(a) She was ashamed.
(b) She was cursed by the saint.
(c) She was now no more a human being. Hence she could not speak.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) She was now no more a human being. Hence she could not speak.

Question 3: What came out of the top of the chimney?
(a) A mouse came out of the top of the chimney.
(b) Smoke came out of the top of the chimney.
(c) The woman came out of the top of the chimney
(d) A woodpecker flew out of the top of the chimney.
Answer
(d) A woodpecker flew out of the top of the chimney.

Question 4: What happened to the woman?
(a) She was transformed into a bird as a punishment for being miserly.
(b) She was punished with the loss of her human voice.
(c) She was deprived of human comforts.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) She was transformed into a bird as a punishment for being miserly.

Stanza 15 of A Legend of the Northland

She had a scarlet cap on her head,
And that was left the same;
But all the rest of her clothes were burned
Black as a coal in the flame.

Question 1: Was the scarlet cap on the woman's head changed?
(a) No, it wasn't. It was left as such even when she was changed into a bird.
(b) Yes, it was. It was turned as black as coal.
(c) The scarlet cap disappeared when she was turned into a bird.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) No, it wasn't. It was left as such even when she was changed into a bird.

Question 2: What was the colour of the feathers on the body of the woodpecker?
(a) It was scarlet.
(b) It was black.
(c) It was green.
(d) It was grey.
Answer
(b) It was black.

Question 3: To whom does the poet compare the colour of the clothes of the woman after she was changed into a bird?
(a) Her clothes were as black as root.
(b) Her clothes were as black as crow.
(c) Her clothes were as black as coal.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) Her clothes were as black as coal.

Question 4: Which two colours had the woodpecker had on its body?
(a) Red and black
(b) Red and white
(c) Yellow and black
(d) Green and black
Answer
(a) Red and black

Stanza 16 of A Legend of the Northland

And every country schoolboy
Has seen her in the wood,
Where she lives in the trees till this very day,
Boring and boring for food.

Question 1: Where can the woodpecker be seen more often?
(a) It can be seen in the forests of rural areas.
(b) It can be seen in the cities.
(c) It can be seen in deserted places.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(a) It can be seen in the forests of rural areas.

Question 2: Where does it live?
(a) It lives in the old houses in villages.
(b) It lives in the trees in forests.
(c) It lives inside dry wells.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(b) It lives in the trees in forests.

Question 3: How does it find its food?
(a) It finds its food by digging holes in the earth.
(b) It finds its food by diving into water.
(c) It finds its food in the form of insects by boring holes in the tree-trunks.
(d) None of the above.
Answer
(c) It finds its food in the form of insects by boring holes in the tree-trunks.

Question 4: Do you think it gets sufficient amount of food?
(a) Yes, it does. It finds food easily.
(b) No, it doesn't. It keeps boring holes laboriously for food.
(c) Yes, sometimes it does, and sometimes it doesn't get sufficient food.
(d) None of the above
Answer
(b) No, it doesn't. It keeps boring holes laboriously for food.

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