New Kings and Kingdoms Extra Questions Chapter 2 Class 7 History

Here we have provided Chapter 2 New Kings and Kingdoms Extra Questions for Class 7 History can be used to know how questions can be framed in the examinations and prepare accordingly. Class 7 Extra Questions will guide students to act in a better way an frame better answers.

New Kings and Kingdoms Extra Questions Chapter 2 Class 7 History

Chapter 2 New Kings and Kingdoms Very Short Answer Questions (VSAQs):


1. What was expected by the kings from samantas?

Answer

To bring gifts and provide them military support.

2. The river Kaveri branches off into several small channels before emptying into the ______.

Answer

Bay of Bengal.

3. How were resources obtained by the states?

Answer

From the producers, peasants, cattle keepers, artisans.

4. What do you mean by Vetti?

Answer

Vetti is a tax taken not in cash but in the form of forced labour.

5. What do you understand about ‘hiranya-garbha’?

Answer

Hiranya-garbha is a ritual leads to the “rebirth” of the sacrificer as a Kshatria, even if he not one by birth.

6. How many taxes were imposed in the Cholas regime?

Answer

There were more than 400 kinds of taxes in the Cholas regime.

7. Who was the founder of the Chola kingdom?

Answer

Vijayalaya.

8. What was referred in prashasti found in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh?

Answer

It describes the exploits of Nagabhata, a Pratihara King.

9. What was the target of Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni?

Answer

The targets of Sultan Mahmud of Ghazni were wealthy temples, including that of Somnath, Gujarat.

10. Where did the Chauhans ruled?

Answer

The Chauhans ruled over the region around Delhi and Ajmer.

11. Who were subordinate to the Pallava kings of Kanchipuram.

Answer

Cholas.

12. Name two greatest Chola rulers.

Answer

Rajaraja I and his son Rajendra I.

13. Who was Dantidurga?

Answer

Dantidurga was a Rashtrakuta chief who overthrew his Chalukya overlord and performed a ritual called hiranya-garbha.

14. Who wrote ‘Kitab-al-Hind’?

Answer

Al-Biruni.

15. Who built Thanjavur and a temple for goddess Nishumbhasudini?

Answer

Vijayalaya.

16. Each village in Chola kingdom had two assemblies. Name them.

Answer

The name of the two assemblies were ur and Sabha.

17. What do you understand by word ‘kadamai?

Answer

Kadamai was tax of the Cholas regime imposed for land revenue.

18. Who were mah-samantas?

Answer

The samantas who got power and wealth were also called maha-samantas.

Chapter 2 New Kings and Kingdoms Short Answer Questions (SAQs):


1. How were the temples hubs for economic, social and cultural life?

Answer

Temples were centres of craft production. These were also endowed with land by rulers as well as by others. The produce of this land went into maintaining all the specialists who worked at the temple and very often lived near it – priests, garland makers, cooks, sweepers, musicians, dancers, etc.

2. What do you mean by maharaja-adhiraja, tribhuvana-chakravartin?

Answer

The meaning of maharaja-adhiraja and tribhuvana-chakravartin are ‘great king’ and ‘Lord of the three worlds’ respectively. Many of the new kings adopted high sounding titles such as maharaja-adhiraja and tribhuvana-chakravartin. They often shared power with their samantas as well as with associations of peasants, traders and Brahmanas.

3. What do you know about the Kadamba Mayurasharman and the Gurjara-Pratihara Harichandra?

Answer

Kadamba Mayurasharman and the Gurjara-Pratihara Harichandra belonged to enterprising brahmana
families. They gave up their traditional professions and used their military skills to carve out kingdoms in Karnataka and Rajasthan respectively.

4. Describe different kinds of taxes that were collected by the Cholas.

Answer

The Cholas collected more than 400 terms for different kinds of taxes. The most prominent among these taxes was vetti, which was taken not in cash but in the form of forced labour, and kadamai, or land revenue. There were also taxes on thatching the house, the use of a ladder to climb palm trees, a less on succession to family property, etc.

5. What do you mean by the term 'prashasti'? Who composed them? What di they get in return?

Answer

The term ‘prashasti’ means ‘in praise of’. Prashastis contain details that may not be literally true. But they tell us how rulers wanted to depict themselves as valiant, victorious warriors, etc. These were composed by learned Brahmanas. In return, kings often rewarded them with grants of land.

6. What attempts were made to expand the regime by the Chauhans?

Answer

The Chauhans attempted to expand their control to the west and the east, where they were opposed by the Chalukyas of Gujarat and the Gahadavalas of western Uttar Pradesh. The best known Chauhans ruler was Prithviraja III (1168-1192), who defeated an Afghan ruler name Sultan Muhammad Ghori in 1191, but next year in 1192 he was defeated by Ghori.

7. What was the sole reason for the tripartite struggle? Why is it called so?

Answer

The city of Kanauj in the Ganga valley was a prized area. It was very fertile. For centuries rulers belonging to the Gurjara-Pratihara, Rashtrakuta and Pala dynasties fought for control over Kanauj. Because there were three parties in this long drawn conflict, historians often describe it a s the tripartite struggle.

8. Describe different kinds of taxes that were collected by the Cholas.

Answer

The Cholas collected more than 400 terms for different kinds o f taxes. The most prominent among these taxes was vetti, which was taken not in cash but in the form of forced labour, and kadamai, or land revenue. There were also taxes on thatching the house, the use of a ladder to climb palm trees, a less on succession to family property, etc.

9. What do you know about the military achievements of Rajaraja I and Rajendra Chola?

Answer

Rajaraja I made the Chola kingdom the supreme power in south India. He was the most powerful ruler. He became king in 985. He fought many wars against the Pandyas and the Cheras and expanded his control over most of these areas. He was succeeded by his son Rajendra I. He continued his father’s policy of conquests. He developed a strong navy and with its help raided the Ganga valley, Sri Lanka and countries of South-east Asia.

10. Describe the development of agriculture in Cholas regime.

Answer

Many of the achievements of the Cholas were made possible through new developments in agriculture. The Kaveri branches off into several channels before emptying into the Bay of Bengal. Water from the channels also provides the necessary moisture for agriculture particularly the cultivation of rice.

Chapter 2 New Kings and Kingdoms Long Answer Questions (LAQs):


1. How did the Cholas rise to power? Descirbe.

Answer

• Vijayalaya was the founder of the Chola kingdom. He conquered Tanjore and ruled over the region to the north of River Kaveri. He built the town of Thanjavur and a temple for goddess Nishumbhasudini there. The successors of Vijayalaya conquered neighbouring regions and the kingdom grew in size and power. The Pandyan and the Pallava territories to the south and the north were made parts of the Chola kingdom.
• The Chola kingdom rose to the height of power during the rule of Rajaraja I and his son, Rajendra I. They were the greatest Chola rulers who strengthened their kingdom in south India. Rajaraja I became king in 985. He expanded control over most of these areas. He also reorganised the administration of the empire.
• Rajendra I succeeded his father Rajaraja I in 1016. He continued his father’s policy of conquests. He developed a strong navy and raided the Ganga valley and Sri Lanka. His campaigned in South-east Asia is worth-mentioning. It is said to be his most daring campaign.
• However, the continuous wars against the neighbouring kingdoms had weakened the Chola empire which ultimately met with its downfall at the end of the thirteenth century.

2. How was the administration managed in the kingdoms that emerged in different parts of the subcontinent between the seventh and the twelfth centuries.

Answer

• Several kingdoms emerged in different parts of subcontinent between the seventh and twelfth centuries. Many of the new kings of these kingdoms adopted high-sounding titles like maharaja-adhiraja and tribhuvana-chakravartin. In spite of such claims they often shared power with their samantas as well as with associations of peasants, traders and Brahmanas.
• In each of these kingdoms, resources were obtained from the producers, i.e. peasants, cattle-keepers, and artisans.
• These people were often persuaded or compelled to surrender part of what they produced. Revenue was also collected from traders.
• These resources were used to finance the king’s establishment, as well as for the construction of temples and forts. Parts of resources were used in warfare.
• The functionaries for collecting revenue were generally recruited from influential families, and positions were often hereditary. The same thing was applied to the army.
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