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Land, Soil, Water, Natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Extra Questions Chapter 2 Class 8 Geography 

Chapter 2 Land, Soil, Water, natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Class 8 History Extra Questions will be very helpful in understanding the basic concepts of the chapter in a well manner. Through the help of Extra Questions for Class 8 Social Science, you will be able to improve your marks in the examinations.

Land, Soil, Water, natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Extra Questions Chapter 2 Class 8 Geography

Chapter 2 Land, Soil, Water, natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Very Short Answer Questions (VSAQs):


1. What human factors determine land use pattern?

Answer

Human factors affecting land use pattern are population and technology.

2. What are the possible reasons behind the uneven distribution of population around the world?

Answer

The reasons behind uneven population distribution are mainly the varied conditions of land and climate.

3. Define soil.

Answer

The thin layer of grainy substance covering the surface of the earth is called soil.

4. What is required to make soil fertile?

Answer

The right mix of minerals and organic matter is needed to make soil fertile.

5. What are the factors threatening soil as a resource?

Answer

Two factors that threaten soil as a resource are soil erosion and its depletion.

6. Why is the earth called the “water planet”?

Answer

The earth’s surface has about three- fourths water, so it is called “water planet”.

7. What is parent rock?

Answer

The rock from which soil is derived is called parent rock.

8. What is the name given to the process involved in rain formation?

Answer

The process involved in the formation of rain is called “water cycle”.

9. What is the distinguishing feature between evergreen and deciduous forests?

Answer

Evergreen forests never shed their leaves whereas deciduous forests shed their leaves once a year.

10. How is a bird like vulture important for the ecosystem?

Answer

A vulture feeds on dead livestock and so it cleanses the environment.

11. What is the Vanamahotsava?

Answer

The social programme of planting trees, organised at community level is called vanamahotsava.

12. Name a method to save surface run-off.

Answer

Water harvesting is a method to save surface run-off.

13. Why do people living in different parts of the world lead very different lives?

Answer

Because of the differences in quality of land, soil, water, natural vegetation, animals and the usage of technology.

14. Why is the Ganga-Brahmaputra plain of India is an overpopulated region?

Answer

The Ganga-Brahmaputra plain of India offers a suitable land for agriculture. Hence, people choose to live there in large number.

Chapter 2 Land, Soil, Water, natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Short Answer Questions (SAQs):


1. What is weathering?

Answer

Weathering refers to the breaking up and decay of exposed rocks. This breaking up and decay is caused by temperature fluctuations between too high and too low, frost action, plants, animals and even human activity. Weathering is the major process involved in the formation of soil. It takes millions of years to form soil by this process.

2. Write a short note on wildlife.

Answer

The animal kingdom, which consists of animals, birds, aquatic creatures and insects, is called wildlife. These creatures provide us various important products such as milk, meat, hides and wool. Bees give us honey and help in pollination. They play the role of decomposers in the environment. Birds like the vulture are scavengers and they help in cleansing the environment. All forms of wildlife are an integral part of our ecosystem.

3. What are the major types of vegetation in the world? Describe vegetation in different rainfall conditions.

Answer

The major types of vegetation in the world are grouped as forests, grasslands, scrubs and tundra.” In areas of heavy rain, huge trees can be found. Forests are abundant in areas of heavy rainfall. With moisture and rainfall the density of forests declines. In moderate rainfall areas, grasslands are found. In dry areas we find thorny shrubs and scrubs. Plants here have deep roots and leaves have thorny surface to reduce loss of moisture. The tundra vegetation consists of mosses and lichens.

4. Classify land on the basis of ownership.

Answer

On the basis of ownership, land can be classified as:
• Private land: Private land is owned by individuals whereas, community land is owned by the community for common uses like collection of fodder, fruits, nuts or medicinal herbs. 
• Community land: The community lands are also called common property resources.

5. How is land being degraded? Suggest methods to conserve land resource.

Answer

The ever-growing population has increased demand for living space, due to which forests are being destroyed, thus causing land degradation. The rate of degradation of land resources can be checked by promoting afforestation, land reclamation, regulated use of chemical pesticide and fertilizers and checking overgrazing.

6. Mention some mitigation techniques of landslides.

Answer

Three mitigation techniques of landslides are:
• Hazard mapping to locate areas prone to landslides. Hence, such areas can be avoided for building settlements.
• Construction of retention wall to stop land from shipping.
• Increase in the vegetation cover to check landslides.
• The surface drainage control works to control the movement of landslide along with rainwater and spring flows.

7. What is CITES? Why has it been established?

Answer

CITES stands for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. It is an international agreement between governments. It aims to ensure that international
trade in specimens of wild animals and 28,000 species of plants are protected. Bears, dolphins, cacti corals, orchids and aloes are some examples.

8. Why is it essential to conserve wildlife? Give three reasons.

Answer

Wildlife includes animals, birds, insects as well as the acquatic life forms. It is essential to conserve them because of the following reasons.
• We get several things such as milk, meat, hides and wool from animals.
• Insects like bees provide us honey, help in pollination of flowers and have an important role to play as decomposes in the ecosystem.
• The birds feed on insects and act as decomposers as well. Vulture due to its ability to feel on dead livestock is a scavenger and considered avital cleanser of the environment. So animals big or small, all are integral to maintaining balance in the ecosystem. Therefore, they need to be conserved.

Chapter 2 Land, Soil, Water, natural Vegetation and Wildlife Resources Long Answer Questions (LAQs):


1. What measures can be adopted to conserve water?

Answer

Water is a valuable natural resource. We can’t imagine a life without water. Hence, its conservation is important for all. The following measures can be adopted in this direction:
• Forest and other vegetation cover should be increased because they slow the surface runoff and replenish underground water.
• Water harvesting should be encouraged to save surface runoff.
• The canals used for irrigating fields should be properly lined to minimise losses by water seepage.
• Sprinklers should be used to irrigate the area by checking water losses through seepage and
evaporation.
• Drip or tickle irrigation method should be adopted in dry regions.

2. Describe methods of soil conservation.

Answer

Some common methods of soil conservation are mentioned below:
• Mulching. Mulching is the process of covering the bare ground between plants with a layer of organic matter like straw. It contributes in retaining soil moisture.
• Terrace Farming: Terrace farming is the method of farming in which broad flat steps or terraces are made on the steep slopes so that flat surfaces are available to grow crops 4 They reduce run-off and soil erosion. 
• Intercropping: In intercropping, different crops are grown in alternate rows and are sown at different times to protect the soil from being washed away by rain.
• Contour Ploughing: Ploughing parallel to the contours of a hill slope to form a natural barrier for water to flow down a slope is called contour ploughing.
• Shelter Belts: Rows of trees that are planted in certain areas to check wind movement are called shelter belts.
• Contour Barriers: Stones, grass and soil are used to build barriers along contours. Trenches are made in front of the barriers to collect water.
• Rock Dams: This prevents gullies and further soil loss since rocks are piled up to slow down the flow of water.
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