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Extract Based Questions for Chapter 2 Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom Class 10 English First Flight with Solutions

Extract based questions for chapter 2 Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom has been prepared by our expert teachers. Students can read and learn from these questions and these are very important in their examination. Class 10 English First Flight Chapter 2 Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom extract based questions are very helpful in understanding the chapter. It also help in the revision. Students can rely on these questions and answers taken from the extract of chapter Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom to get good marks in their English Paper.

Extract Based Questions for Chapter 2 Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom Class 10 English First Flight with Solutions

Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom Extract Based Questions Class 10 English

Extract 1 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

Tenth May dawned bright and clear. For the past few days I had been pleasantly besieged by dignitaries and world leaders who were coming to pay their respects before the inauguration. The inauguration would be the largest gathering ever of international leaders on South African soil.

Question 1: Who is in these lines? in these lines is:
(i) Nelson Mandela's daughter Zenani
(ii) Nelson Mandela
(iii) Mr. De Klerk
(iv) Mr. Thabo Mebeki

Answer

(ii) Nelson Mandela


Question 2: Which inauguration ceremony is being talked about here?
(i) the inauguration ceremony of new bridge in South Africa.
(ii) the inauguration ceremony of African Olympics.
(iii) the inauguration ceremony of biggest university of the world.
(iv) the inauguration ceremony of the Nelson Mandela's Presidentship

Answer

(iv) the inauguration ceremony of the Nelson Mandela's Presidentship


Question 3: What had he been pleasantly besieged by dignitaries?
(i) for the largest gathering ever of international leaders on South African soil.
(ii) for making the largest bridge in the world.
(iii) for being the first ever black President of South Africa.
(iv) for inviting all the international leaders on South African soil

Answer

(iii) for being the first ever black President of South Africa.


Question 4: The meaning of world 'besieged' is:
(i) to attack from all side.
(ii) to surround a place especially with army.
(iii) to visit a person in large gatherings.
(iv) to congratulate a person for his accomplishments.

Answer

(ii) to surround a place especially with army.


Extract 2 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

In life, every man has twin obligation- obligations to his family, to his parents, to his wife and children; and he has an obligation to his people, his community, his country. In a civil and humane society, each man is able to fulfil those obligations according to his own inclinations and abilities. But in a country like South Africa, it was almost impossible for a man of my birth and colour to fulfil both of those obligations. In South Africa, a man of colour who attempted to live as a human being was punished and isolated.

Question 1: What are the obligations that every man has in his life?
(i) nature and his family.
(ii) family and friends.
(iii) his family and his country.
(iv) God and his family.

Answer

(ii) family and friends.


Question 2: Why was it impossible for a coloured man to discharge his obligations in South Africa?
(i) he would be punished and isolated.
(ii) he would face many obstacles.
(iii) he would be killed.
(iv) his family members would be killed.

Answer

(i) he would be punished and isolated.


Question 3: What does it mean by the phrase 'a man of my birth'?
(i) a person who is born in a royal family.
(ii) that the person was born in an educated family.
(iii) that the person was born in an uneducated family.
(iv) that the person was born in a poor and humble family.

Answer

(iv) that the person was born in a poor and humble family.


Question 4: What is the adjective form of 'punished'?
(i) punish
(ii) punishing
(iii) his family and his country
(iv) punishment

Answer

(iv) punishment


Extract 3 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

We, who were outlaws not so long ago, have today been given the rare privilege to be host to the nations of the world on our town soil. We thank all our distinguished international guests for having come to take possession with the people of our country of what is, after all, a common victory for justice, for peace, for human dignity. We have, at last, achieved our political emancipation. We pledge ourselves to liberate all our people from the continuing bondage of poverty, deprivation, suffering, gender and other discrimination.

Question 1: What does the phrase 'rare privilege' mean here?
(i) the opportunity of winning the first Olympic gold medal.
(ii) the rare privilege to host the nations of the world.
(iii) the rare privilege where a black person become the president of South Africa.
(iv) the rare privilege to meet the important leaders of the world.

Answer

(ii) the rare privilege to host the nations of the world.


Question 2: Why does Mandela thank the gathering?
(i) for helping him become the president of South Africa.
(ii) for gracing the occassion to celebrate his country's victory of justice, peace and human dignity.
(iii) for voting for him in the elections and helping him win the elections.
(iv) for helping him in taking his country towards the path of progress.

Answer

(ii) for gracing the occassion to celebrate his country's victory of justice, peace and human dignity.


Question 3: What have the people of this country achieved?
(i) happiness, joy and prosperity.
(ii) wisdom, good luck and richness of culture.
(iii) a common victory for justice, peace and human dignity.
(iv) success in educational, economic and political field.

Answer

(ii) wisdom, good luck and richness of culture.


Question 4: Give a word similar in meaning to 'a special right' from the passage.
(i) deprivation
(ii) discrimination
(iii) bondage
(iv) privilege

Answer

(iv) privilege


Extract 4 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

On the day of the inauguration, I was overwhelmed with a sense of history. In the first decade of the twentieth century, a few years after the bitter Anglo-Boer war and before my own birth, the white-skinned people of South Africa patched up their differences and erected a system of racial domination against the dark-skinned people of their own land. The structure they created formed the basis of one of the harshest, most inhumane societies the world has ever known. Now, in the last decade of the twentieth century, and my own eighth decade as a man, that system had been overturned forever and replaced by one that recognised the rights and freedoms of all people, regardless of the colour of their skin.

Question 1: What made author overwhelmed?
(i) The sense of history.
(ii) The sense of power.
(iii) The sense of helplessness.
(iv) The sense of gratitude.

Answer

(iv) The sense of gratitude.


Question 2: Which system was created by white-skinned people of South Africa?
(i) social discrimination against the dark skinned people.
(ii) equality and unity.
(iii) brotherhood and oneness.
(iv) annexing the African territories.

Answer

(i) social discrimination against the dark skinned people.


Question 3: What did the new system recognize?
(i) the rights and freedom of all people, regardless of the colour of their skin.
(ii) the different rights of different gender.
(iii) the different rights for black-skinned and white-skinned people.
(iv) all of the above.

Answer

(i) the rights and freedom of all people, regardless of the colour of their skin.


Question 4: Which word in the passage means same as 'submerged'?
(i) Patched
(ii) Decade
(iii) Overwhelmed
(iv) Recognize

Answer

(iii) Overwhelmed


Extract 5 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom 

That day had come about through the unimaginable sacrifices of thousands of my people, people whose suffering and courage can never be counted or repaid. I felt that day, as I have on so many other days, that I was simply the sum of all those African patriots who had gone before me. That long and noble line ended and now began again with me. I was pained that I was not able to thank them and that they were not able to see what their sacrifices had wrought.

Question 1: Which day does the author refer to?
(i) the day of war.
(ii) the day of installation of the new government.
(iii) the day of victory of black people.
(iv) the day of liberty for the black people.

Answer

(i) the day of war.


Question 2: What did the author feel that day?
(i) he was the sum of all those patriots who had gone before him.
(ii) he must occupy the president's post.
(iii) white people should go away.
(iv) he should make black people rule over the whites.

Answer

(i) he was the sum of all those patriots who had gone before him.


Question 3: Why was the author pained?
(i) he was not able to thank all those who had sacrificed their lives.
(ii) he was not able to do something for the white people.
(iii) he felt that he should send the white people away.
(iv) he was not happy.

Answer

(i) he was not able to thank all those who had sacrificed their lives.


Question 4: Which word in the passage mean same as 'created'?
(i) Patriot
(ii) Wrought
(iii) Unimaginable
(iv) Courage

Answer

(ii) Wrought


Extract 6 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

The policy of apartheid created a deep and lasting wound in my country and my people. All of us will spend many years, if not generations, recovering from that profound hurt. But the decades of oppression and brutality had another, unintended, effect, and that was that it produced the Oliver Tambos, the Walter Sisulus, the Chief Luthulis, the Yusuf Dadoos, the Bram Fischers, the Robert Sobukwes of our time - men of such extraordinary courage, wisdom and generosity that their like may never be known again.

Question 1: What was created in the people of South Africa by the policy of apartheid
(i) A happy and joyful environment.
(ii) A deep and lasting wound on the people of South Africa.
(iii) A big divide between rich and poor.
(iv) A big gap between the people and the government.

Answer

(i) A happy and joyful environment.


Question 2: What was the other effect of the decades of oppression?
(i) it created coward people
(ii) it created courageous and great people.
(iii) it created a feeling of jealousy.
(iv) all of the above.

Answer

(ii) it created courageous and great people.


Question 3: What is the greatest wealth of his country, according to the people?
(i) its people
(ii) its resources
(iii) its soil and minerals
(iv) its leaders and social workers.

Answer

(i) its people


Question 4: Which word in the passage mean the same as 'racial discrimination on the basis of colour'?
(i) generations
(ii) apartheid
(iii) Wealth
(iv) oppression

Answer

(ii) apartheid


Extract 7 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

"It was only when I began to learn that my boyhood freedom was an illusion, when I discovered as a young man that my freedom had already been taken from me, that I began to hunger for it. At first as a student, I wanted freedom only for myself, the transitory freedom of being able to stay out at night, read what I pleased and go where I chose. Later, as a young man in Johannesburg, I yearned for the basic and honourable freedoms..."

Question 1: The speaker says, 'at first as a student I wanted freedom only for myself.' Why do you think he only thought about himself?
(i) He didn't want to think about the freedom denied to others.
(ii) He was being selfish and was only bothered about himself.
(iii) He didn't think that freedom denied to him was important for others.
(iv) He was too young to realise that freedom was denied to others as well.

Answer

(iv) He was too young to realise that freedom was denied to others as well.

When he was a young boy, he did not have a wider vision – he was more concerned about his personal freedom. He could not look from other people’s perspective that they too were deprived of freedom in much more important aspects than his boyish perspective.


Question 2: Why do you think the speaker mentions some freedoms as 'transitory'?
(i) The freedoms are momentary and keep changing with time.
(ii) The definition of freedom is constant but perspectives differ.
(iii) Freedom means different things to different people.
(iv) Freedom is not that important after a certain age.

Answer

(i) The freedoms are momentary and keep changing with time.

‘Transitory ’ means ‘temporary ’ or ‘passing’. So, option (i) that states freedoms as momentary or temporary, and changing with time correct.


Question 3: The title that best suits this extract is:
(i) Freedom for Everything
(ii) Knowledge about Freedom
(iii) Significance of Freedom
(iv) Realisation of Freedom

Answer

(iii) Significance of Freedom

The extract explains why freedom is important and what it means to those who are not free. So, significance of freedom is the correct title for the extract.


Question 4: Choose the option that best fits the usage of the word 'illusion' as used in the extract.
(i) He was never able to get past the illusion.
(ii) The illusion I experienced was quite intriguing.
(iii) A large mirror in the room creates an illusion.
(iv) I was living under the illusion that this is possible.

Answer

(iv) I was living under the illusion that this is possible.

In the passage, the narrator had been living a life under a deception or misapprehension - an illusion. This similar meaning is conveyed in option (iv).


Question 5: A part of the extract has been paraphrased. Choose the option that includes the most appropriate solution to the blanks in the given paraphrase of the extract.

The speaker's belief about freedom, since childhood proved false. It was not until the speaker grew up to be a young man when it (a) ______on him that he was (b)_______of freedom. Then he began (c)_________ it.
(i) (a) desired (b) dawned (c) depriving
(ii) (a) dawned (b) deprived (c) desiring
(iii) (a) dawned (b) arrived (c) desiring
(iv) (a) arrived (b) deprived (c) dawned

Answer

(ii) (a) dawned (b) deprived (c) desiring

Here, Dawned means emergence of a thought, Deprived means denied and desiring means wanting to have. These meanings best fit the given part of the extract.


Extract 8 of Nelson Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom

"We, who were outlaws not so long ago, have today been given the rare privilege to be host to the nations of the world on our own soil. We thank all of our distinguished international guests for having come to take possession with the people of our country of what is, after all, a common victory for justice, for peace, for human dignity."

Question 1: How do you think the speaker feels? Choose the option that best fits his state of mind.
(i) (a) emotional (b) elated (c) unmindful
(ii) (a) elated (b) unmindful (c) overwhelmed
(iii) (a) overwhelmed (b) elated (c) honoured
(iv) (c) elated (b) honoured (c) unmindful

Answer

(iv) (c) elated (b) honoured (c) unmindful

Unmindful means careless or forgetful. The speaker is recalling years of struggle and is asking his fellow citizens to maintain this freedom carefully. So, all the options (i), (ii) and (iii) express unmindfulness as a feeling of the speaker which is not correct.


Question 2: It is a victory for 'human dignity'. Pick the option that lists the correct answer for what 'human dignity' would include.
(i) (a) equality (b) liberty (c) indecency
(ii) (a) liberty (b) indecency (c) self-respect
(iii) (a) immorality (b) self-respect (c) equality
(iv) (a) equality (b) liberty (c) self-respect

Answer

(iv) (a) equality (b) liberty (c) self-respect

In Options (i) and (ii), indecency means not decent, which is against human dignity. In Option (iii) immorality or not being moral is also against human dignity. The virtues of equality, liberty and self respect best define human dignity.


Question 3: The guests at the spectacular ceremony are being called distinguished because :
(i) they have been invited as guests to attend it.
(ii) they are eminent world leaders witnessing it.
(iii) they are visiting the country for this purpose.
(iv) they have resumed diplomatic relations with the country.

Answer

(ii) they are eminent world leaders witnessing it.

‘Distinguished’ here means ‘someone different from the common’. The guest list consisted of some prominent and well-known leaders of the world.


Question 4: Why does the speaker say that it is a 'rare privilege'?

He says this as they have:
(i) been deprived of this honour.
(ii) seldom been given this honour.
(iii) experienced it for the first time.
(iv) been chosen over other countries, for this honour.

Answer

(iii) experienced it for the first time.

After decades of resentment, the Blacks have got equal rights as the Whites. It was the first time that those generations were experiencing this.


Question 5: Pick the option that showcases the usage of 'host' as in the extract.
(i) He was praised for his hospitality as the host of the party.
(ii) She was able to host the event without any hindrance.
(iii) She met the host and apologised for her friend's misbehaviour.
(iv) He is the best host that one can ever come across.

Answer

(ii) She was able to host the event without any hindrance.

In options, (i), (iii) and (iv), ‘host’ is used as a noun and refers to a person. In the extract, ‘host’ is used as a verb meaning organising an event and inviting others to join which is the same as used in option (ii).

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